Digital Citizenship: Digital Rights and Responsibilities

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access, Commerce, Communication, Literacy, Etiquette, and Law.

Digital Rights and Responsibilities are those “freedoms extended to everyone in a digital world”(Ribble, 2011). There are a basic rights that every digital user has like privacy or free speech and there are basic responsibilities too like using technology in an appropriate way. We must teach these ideas to our students and be aware of them ourselves, because a productive digital society needs both of these areas working together.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Law

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access, Commerce, Communication, Literacy, and Etiquette.

Digital Law is “electronic responsibility for actions and deeds”(Ribble, 2011). Basically, it deals with the ethics of using technology. Ethical use is law-abiding, unethical use is criminal in nature. Laws apply to everyone who is online. Online crimes include but are not limited to hacking other’s info, downloading illegal media, plagiarizing, identity theft, damaging property, stealing and creating harmful viruses, worms or Trojan Horses.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Etiquette

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access, Commerce, Communication, and Literacy.

Digital Etiquette is defined as “electronic standards of conduct or procedure”(Ribble, 2011). This is probably the area that raises the most red flags. We know what is wrong when we see it from someone else but that isn’t enough. We need to learn and teach our students what appropriate online conduct is and teach them how to talk to others about digital etiquette in a positive and constructive way. It is not enough to just create etiquette rules and policies for our classroom usage, we need to help students understand why these rules and policies are in place and how they carry over into the whole digital world, even beyond the classroom. For example, teach them that typing in all capital letters is considered to be aggressive as if you are yelling your message. 

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Literacy

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, checkout the posts on Digital Access, Commerce and Communication.

Digital Literacy is the “process of teaching and learning about technology and the use of technology”(Ribble, 2011). Students need to be taught how to learn new digital skills.  Technology is constantly evolving and new things are coming out everyday. Students need to learn the information literacy skills (processing and searching) needed to figure out new technology quickly and appropriately. We need to instill the idea that technology mastery and learning is not a pass or a fail moment but a continued journey that they will be on for the rest of their lives.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Communication

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access and Commerce.

Digital Communication is “electronic exchange of information” (Ribble, 2011). People used to have a significant delay to communicate with people who were far away that required traveling to meet in person or sending correspondence through a mail courier. Today we have tons of instant communication options such as email, phones, texting, instant messages, video conferencing, etc. We have the chance to collaborate and communicate with anyone (provided they have the same communication method accessible to them). We have to learn and teach our students how to use good judgment to make appropriate choices when communicating with the many digital options available.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizanship: Digital Access

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over the next several posts.

Digital Access is “full electronic participation in society” (Ribble, 2011). Not everyone in the world has the same opportunities when it comes to technology, some have no access or limited access so we need to figure out how to provide more access or additional resources to balance the playing field. Currently, technology is a type of privilege. We need to work towards equal digital rights, providing and expanding access to technology is a major goal of digital citizenship. To become productive citizens, we need to be committed to making sure that no one is denied digital access. Digital exclusion makes it difficult to grow as a society increasingly using these tools.

References

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

TPA #2-Submission Update

I took a month off of my Master’s courses and even updating my site to focus on getting my TPA #2 put together and submitted. I admit working in Taskstream is tedious to me with all the pop-ups, timeouts and other annoyances. So I worked on writing my answers out on a google document. I copied my answers onto the Taskstream form and then I realized my mistake. I did not copy the directions. Somewhere along the way, I forgot that each question had a maximum limit of 10k characters and started thinking 10k words. So about 75% of my answers were within that 10k character limit, about 10% of my answers were easily editable down to the 10k limit but the remaining 15% of my answers were way-way too long. It was a long and super frustrating process of editing my responses down to the 10k character limit. So if you hate working in Taskstream and opt to write in a word document, make sure to note the 10k limit for each question so you don’t end up frustrated like me. I completed the work, turned it in on 11/25/2017 at 4:19pm and began to wait anxiously for the scoring.

SUPER Resource Spotlight: Edutopia

Edutopia has been a go-to stop for education resources. I think one of my favorite parts is the video archive which lets me view other people’s projects in action to get a better understanding of what it might look like in my own classroom.  Seeing a positive example of a success in the classroom will help me be better prepared to design similar curriculum for my own class. Edutopia has great articles and videos on a wide array of topics including but not limited to technology integration in the classroom, differentiated instructionassessments, cooperative learning, project-based learning, curriculum development, etc. The list goes on and on, certainly worth bit of time to explore.

Professional Development Spotlight: Teach Thought

TeachThought  is a stellar site that has discussions on  Critical Thinking, Learning, Teaching, Technology and the Future of Learning and provides resources for teachers. This is a professional development resource where you can find tips on how to work smarter not harder. The first year of teaching is supposedly the hardest so I appreciate any help I can get in preparation for that adventure.