Digital Citizenship: Digital Etiquette

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access, Commerce, Communication, and Literacy.

Digital Etiquette is defined as “electronic standards of conduct or procedure”(Ribble, 2011). This is probably the area that raises the most red flags. We know what is wrong when we see it from someone else but that isn’t enough. We need to learn and teach our students what appropriate online conduct is and teach them how to talk to others about digital etiquette in a positive and constructive way. It is not enough to just create etiquette rules and policies for our classroom usage, we need to help students understand why these rules and policies are in place and how they carry over into the whole digital world, even beyond the classroom. For example, teach them that typing in all capital letters is considered to be aggressive as if you are yelling your message. 

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Literacy

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, checkout the posts on Digital Access, Commerce and Communication.

Digital Literacy is the “process of teaching and learning about technology and the use of technology”(Ribble, 2011). Students need to be taught how to learn new digital skills.  Technology is constantly evolving and new things are coming out everyday. Students need to learn the information literacy skills (processing and searching) needed to figure out new technology quickly and appropriately. We need to instill the idea that technology mastery and learning is not a pass or a fail moment but a continued journey that they will be on for the rest of their lives.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Communication

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the posts on Digital Access and Commerce.

Digital Communication is “electronic exchange of information” (Ribble, 2011). People used to have a significant delay to communicate with people who were far away that required traveling to meet in person or sending correspondence through a mail courier. Today we have tons of instant communication options such as email, phones, texting, instant messages, video conferencing, etc. We have the chance to collaborate and communicate with anyone (provided they have the same communication method accessible to them). We have to learn and teach our students how to use good judgment to make appropriate choices when communicating with the many digital options available.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizenship: Digital Commerce

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over several posts, check out the post on Digital Access.

Digital Commerce is “electronic buying and selling of goods” (Ribble, 2011). A big part of the economy is done electronically now. There are legal and legitimate purchases of cars, clothes, food, toys, etc. which are now common through retailers like Amazon. However, there are goods and services which are illegal and morally unsavory (by some countries standards) and users need to learn how to be effective and safe consumers in this new digital economy.

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.

Digital Citizanship: Digital Access

We as teachers need to understand, teach our students about and participate in Digital Citizenship. So what is Digital Citizenship? I am going to cover the nine elements of Digital Citizenship over the next several posts.

Digital Access is “full electronic participation in society” (Ribble, 2011). Not everyone in the world has the same opportunities when it comes to technology, some have no access or limited access so we need to figure out how to provide more access or additional resources to balance the playing field. Currently, technology is a type of privilege. We need to work towards equal digital rights, providing and expanding access to technology is a major goal of digital citizenship. To become productive citizens, we need to be committed to making sure that no one is denied digital access. Digital exclusion makes it difficult to grow as a society increasingly using these tools.

References

Ribble, M. (2011). Digital citizenship in schools. ISTE. Retrieved December 3, 2017, from https://www.iste.org/docs/excerpts/DIGCI2-excerpt.pdf.